(Many) thoughts on the future of music education

vaep20.v115.i01.coverI’m delighted to be part of a special issue of Arts Education Policy Review (v. 115, no. 1). The focus of the issue is the future of music education, with articles that revisit a 2001 article by Scott Shuler from the same publication and then go on to make new predictions.

The respondents include Barbara Payne McLain, Scott Shuler, and Evan Tobias. My response, “Algorithms and the Future of Music Education: A Response to Shuler,” discusses the rising importance of algorithms in music and education. I make the case that the pervasive nature of algorithms make them consequential for all students and teachers, and I present five implications for music educators. The authors all shared drafts along the way, making the process a pleasant collaboration, and I do recommend writing for AEPR, in part due to the opportunity to work with Editor-in-Chief Colleen Conway (and this issue also has a short piece on writing for AEPR).

For those without institutional access, view the article for free through the post-print version on the UF online repository.

As a follow-up, here’s a post on The New Yorker, with an info graphic depicting what categories of information that services use to create a model of each user.

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About Matthew

Music education: media, technology, and participatory music.
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One Response to (Many) thoughts on the future of music education

  1. Pingback: NAfME 2014 Nashville presentation on Algorithms | Matthew Thibeault

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